Coastal Trail Guide

Mendocino Land Trust

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Northern Coastal Trails

Hike Our Trails

Mendocino Land Trust has pioneered the way in California for nongovernmental organizations to open and operate public access trail easements. The abundance of coastal access trails helps contribute to the local economy, providing healthy opportunities to get out and enjoy our beautiful coast to residents and visitors.

The California Coastal Trail is managed and maintained by a wide variety of Federal, State, County, City, and non-governmental organizations (non-profits) throughout California and on the Mendocino Coast.

  • No cell phone receptionThis location has no cellular reception. Please plan accordingly. We recommend that you download the PDF trail data sheet below to your device prior to your trip to this location.

    This 2.3-mile trail offers a wide variety of coastal “experiences,” including expansive views of Mendocino’s remote and wild “Lost Coast,” deep redwood and Douglas fir forests, and old-growth trees sculpted into bizarre shapes by salty winds. There is a magic and mystery present here. It is an all-day excursion to get to this trail from Fort Bragg or Mendocino, and the Usal Road is only open during the dry season. It’s well worth the trip, though it’s a rugged adventure and hike.

    The Lost Coast Trail continues north of Usal for 53 miles, winding up and down through the Sinkyone Wilderness State Park in Mendocino County and along the beach in the BLM Kings Range National Conservation Area, ending at the Mattole River in Humboldt County.

    Download Trail Data Sheet [PDF]

    Peter Douglas Trail trail map

    Click or tap to view the full-size map.

    The Lost Coast Trail continues north of Usal for 53 miles, winding up and down through the Sinkyone Wilderness State Park in Mendocino County and along the beach in the BLM Kings Range National Conservation Area, ending at the Mattole River in Humboldt County

    Trail Latitude (X): 39.814

    Trail Longitude (Y): -123.839

    Mapping: View vicinity on Google Maps (see Trail Map above or Trail Data Sheet PDF under the Information tab for a more precise map)

    Highway One Mile Marker (north end): 90.91

    Highway One Mile Marker (south end): 90.6

    Trail Length: 2.3 miles

    This wild and beautiful section of the California Coastal Trail is dedicated to the memory of Peter Douglas (1942-2012), who was the Executive Director of the California Coastal Commission for more than 25 years.  He was a fierce guardian of California's 1,100-mile-long coastline, and he battled to preserve its natural beauty and public access to its beaches. He was the main author of California's landmark coastal protection law, the Coastal Act. It only seems fitting that this trail at Shady Dell be named for him, as a way of honoring his tireless dedication to conserving and protecting for future generations the beautiful California Coast. 


    Peter would be proud of the collaborative work that led to this trail being built in his name on this remote part of the California Coast.  It takes a village, and the California Coastal Conservancy, Coastal Commission, Save the Redwoods League, Mendocino Land Trust, California Conservation Corps, NCCC Americorps, Redwood Forest Foundation, Coastwalk, and many other organizations and individuals played a part in the creation of this trail. 

    It’s not unusual to see Roosevelt Elk and other wildlife near Usal Beach. Also at the north end of the Peter Douglas Trail is a “candelabra redwood forest,” featuring large old trees that the salt and wind have twisted into strange shapes and designs. There are over 300 handmade steps climbing a steep hill in this part of the CCT. Portions of the trail are on old logging roads, enabling friends and family to hike side-by-side if they wish. There is also a bridge across Shady Dell Creek that was built by local craftsman John Koski, with stringers and decking made from locally milled Fort Bragg redwood.

  • The Westport Headlands is a community gathering spot with a rich history of past uses. In the past, this spot was used as a ship landing, and a careful observer can find signs of that history. Today, the site features picnic areas, a stairway to the rocky cove beach below the headlands, and blackberries in late summer. The public can also enjoy ocean views, whale and bird watching, beachcombing, tidepools, fishing, kayaking, and a children’s natural play area at this location. This public access area is managed by the Westport Village Society (WVS), and has street parking as well as an ADA parking area and platform. For more information, please contact WVS at wvs@westportvillagesociety.org or visit their website at www.westportvillagesociety.org

    Download Trail Data Sheet [PDF]

    Westport Headlands Trail trail map

    Click or tap to view the full-size map.

    Trail Latitude (X): 39.6378

    Trail Longitude (Y): -123.7851

    Mapping: View vicinity on Google Maps (see Trail Map above or Trail Data Sheet PDF under the Information tab for a more precise map)

    Highway One Mile Marker (north end): 77.48

    Highway One Mile Marker (south end): 77.39

    Trail Length: 0.3 miles

  • This 1.2-mile long segment of the California Coastal Trail is managed by the Mendocino Land Trust. The trail runs parallel to Highway One along its entire length. A parking lot near Highway One and trail to a viewing platform near the bluff edge were built in the Summer of 2016.

    Download Trail Data Sheet [PDF]

    Newport Trail trail map

    Click or tap to view the full-size map.

    The Newport Trail map shows this trail’s location relative to Bruhel Point to the north, as well as Seaside Beach and Ten Mile State Natural Reserve in MacKerricher State Park to the south.

    Trail Latitude (X): 39.638

    Trail Longitude (Y): -123.7844

    Mapping: View vicinity on Google Maps (see Trail Map above or Trail Data Sheet PDF under the Information tab for a more precise map)

    Highway One Mile Marker (north end): 73.22

    Highway One Mile Marker (south end): 72.15

    Trail Length: 1.25 miles

    The trail’s name was changed in 2015 from the Kibesillah Coastal Trail to the Newport Coastal Trail, to match the land’s more accurate place name and that of the recently constructed Inn at Newport Ranch.

  • Beautiful, sandy, and very popular Seaside Beach is located ten miles north of Fort Bragg on the Mendocino Coast. It’s owned and managed by the Mendocino Land Trust. This expansive pocket beach is much loved by locals and visitors to the Mendocino Coast.

    Download Trail Data Sheet [PDF]

    Seaside Beach trail map

    Click or tap to view the full-size map.

    The Seaside Beach map shows the area’s public access amenities, including trails, parking, and the beach’s location relative to MacKerricher State Park to the south.

    Trail Latitude (X): 39.558

    Trail Longitude (Y): -123.765

    Mapping: View vicinity on Google Maps (see Trail Map above or Trail Data Sheet PDF under the Information tab for a more precise map)

    Highway One Mile Marker (north end): 70.7

    Highway One Mile Marker (south end): 70.5

    Trail Length: 0.5 miles

    Coastal Land Trust, the former landowner at Seaside Beach, completed a successful Japanese knotweed removal project in 2010, which removed about 0.3 acres of this invasive plant on lands east of Seaside Beach. One of the photos shows the knotweed removal effort while it was underway. Mendocino Land Trust organizes monthly volunteer workdays at Seaside Beach and Meadow- call us if you’d like to help.

    Dogs are welcome at Seaside, but not allowed south of the Ten Mile River, which is at the south end of this beach. The endangered snowy plover lives and nests just south of the Ten Mile River. This is a small shorebird that is protected by Federal law. State Parks will ticket anyone with a dog in the Ten Mile Dunes Natural Reserve. Please respect these rules, and keep your dog north of the Ten Mile River at all times. The snowy plover’s survival in this area depends upon you!

  • MacKerricher State Park offers diverse coastal trail opportunities, including one of the most extensive sand dune ecosystems on the Mendocino Coast, a partially paved haul road for bikers, baby strollers, runners, equestrians, and hikers, and sandy beaches and hiking trails that extend for miles, as well as a campground with a boardwalk to Laguna Point and around Lake Cleone. To the south are Glass Beach, the Pudding Creek Trestle, and the Noyo Headlands in the City of Fort Bragg, and to the north is Seaside Beach, which is managed by the Mendocino Land Trust.  

    Download Trail Data Sheet [PDF]

    MacKerricher Coastal Trail trail map

    Click or tap to view the full-size map.

    Trail Latitude (X): 39.458

    Trail Longitude (Y): -123.808

    Mapping: View vicinity on Google Maps (see Trail Map above or Trail Data Sheet PDF under the Information tab for a more precise map)

    Highway One Mile Marker (north end): 64.8

    Highway One Mile Marker (south end): 62

    Trail Length: 4.75 miles

  • This is one of the newest segments of the California Coastal Trail, on the headlands west of the City of Fort Bragg. It’s a multi-use, ADA-accessible paved trail with spectacular views, parking, rest rooms, and one-of-a-kind benches made by local artists. There are several ways to access this new public coastal trail, from the west ends of North Harbor Drive, Cypress Street, and Elm Street. The trail has two distinct pieces at present- the north, with parking at west end of Elm Street, south of Glass Beach, and the south, with parking at west end of Cypress Street, which is north of Noyo Harbor. The third phase of trail construction will connect these two pieces.

    It’s a spectacular trail. There are many interpretive panels explaining the human and natural history of the site. Bikers, strollers, roller bladers, hikers, runners, families, and dogs on leash are welcome on this trail, which connects on its north end to MacKerricher State Park and on its south end to the Noyo Harbor and Pomo Bluffs Park. Views that have been off-limits to the general public for over a century are now open for public enjoyment, and the wildlife viewing opportunities here are varied and superb.

    Download Trail Data Sheet [PDF]

    Noyo Headlands Trail trail map

    Click or tap to view the full-size map.

    Trail Latitude (X): 39.4519

    Trail Longitude (Y): -123.8097

    Mapping: View vicinity on Google Maps (see Trail Map above or Trail Data Sheet PDF under the Information tab for a more precise map)

    Trail Length: 3 miles

  • Hare Creek Beach is a very sweet pocket beach owned by Mendocino Land Trust, located at the south end of the City of Fort Bragg. This beach can be accessed from Bay View Drive, Mendocino College, or the intersection of Highways 1 and 20. The Mendocino Land Trust (MLT) manages this beach and the 0.6-mile trail to it from the north side of Hare Creek. There is a stairway from the south side that is buffeted by high winter tides and is currently in disrepair, though it was rebuilt in 2015.

    This beach is a migratory bird rest stop, and an informative interpretive panel explains the importance of keeping your dog on leash at this and any beach that serves this purpose for tired birds.

    MLT hosts monthly volunteer workdays to remove invasive plants, pick up trash, and steward this special place. For more information, please contact MLT.

    Download Trail Data Sheet [PDF]

    Hare Creek Trail trail map

    Click or tap to view the full-size map.

    Trail Latitude (X): 39.419

    Trail Longitude (Y): -123.811

    Mapping: View vicinity on Google Maps (see Trail Map above or Trail Data Sheet PDF under the Information tab for a more precise map)

    Highway One Mile Marker (north end): 60

    Highway One Mile Marker (south end): 59.6

    Trail Length: 0.6 miles

  • This 0.7-mile long trail leads to Belinda Point, as well as a stairway down to a rocky pocket beach. The trail is within two public access easements on private property, which were required by the California Coastal Commission in the 1990s, because of likelihood of “prescriptive rights” gained here through decades of public use. The point was named “Belinda Point” because in 1948, the film “Johnny Belinda” was filmed here.

    This trail is perfect for families with small children. There is a boardwalk through a seasonally wet part of the trail, which then travels through a eucalyptus forest and out to the bluff edge. The stairway down to the pocket cove is sturdy and easy to find. This hiking trail is managed by the Mendocino Land Trust.   

    Download Trail Data Sheet [PDF]

    Belinda Point Trail trail map

    Click or tap to view the full-size map.

    Trail Latitude (X): 39.398

    Trail Longitude (Y): -123.813

    Mapping: View vicinity on Google Maps (see Trail Map above or Trail Data Sheet PDF under the Information tab for a more precise map)

    Highway One Mile Marker (north end): 59

    Highway One Mile Marker (south end): 58.5

    Trail Length: 0.7 miles